Glossary

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  • When a player gets a two minute minor penalty and a ten minute misconduct penalty at the same time.
  • When the game ends in a tie each team gets a point and the evetual winner gets an extra point for the win. So three points are awarded for the game.
  • When 2 teams in the same division play each other. One team stands to win 2 points and on team loses 2 points in the standings.
  • Area between the goalie's legs.
  • Used as an insult to describe a player.
  • One hundred percent giving it everything you have, and more.
  • Player hit hard into the boards.
  • Is used to describe a type of play or shot that goes in a direction or against the flow that is less expected by opponents, including goaltenders. It often involves a player making a move or taking a shot in a way that surprises the opposition, catching them off guard. A player might make a(...) Read More
  • When a player is hesitant to fully extend their arms to avoid being hit by an opposing player.
  • Any physical interaction between two or more opposing players that results in a penalty (or penalties) being assessed.
  • A teammate who sinks the team.
  • Driving an opposing teams player away from the middle of the defnsive zone away from the prime scoring areas in front of the net.
  • A player who skates poorly with their ankles bent inwards.
  • A slang term for an assist on a goal.
  • A turnover leading to an assist on the opposing team's goal.
  • The path the puck takes as it moves along the boards or the outer perimeter of the rink. The "dasher" is another term for the boards that encircle the playing surface in an ice hockey rink. In essence, "around the dasher" describes the puck's path along the boards or the wall, and this area(...) Read More
  • This term is often used to describe the path the puck takes when it travels from one end of the rink to the other along the boards or the wall. In essence, "around the rim" describes the puck's path along the boards or wall, and this area is a key part of the playing surface where many(...) Read More
  • An assist is awarded to the player or players (maximum of two) who touched the puck prior to the goal, provided no defender plays or possesses the puck in between.
  • When you are on the attack, your attacking zone is between your opponent's blue line and goal line.
  • When a player gets cut from the team or sent down.
  • A stick.
  • When a superstar player is put on a line with two lesser-skilled players.
  • A shooting or passing technique where a player directs the puck in the opposite direction of the movement or flow of play. It involves surprising the goaltender or opposing players by shooting or passing the puck against the natural flow of the play.
  • Rushing back to the defensive zone in response to an opposing team's attack and checking the player you are responsible for in an attempt to regain control of the puck.
  • Refers to a specific scoring opportunity or play that occurs near the opponent's net. It involves a player positioning themselves near the far post or the "back door" of the goal, away from the primary action in front of the net. Read More
  • A pass back to a teammate trailing the play.
  • A pass or shot that is taken from the backside of the blade.
  • A commonly used insult in hockey, in reference to a player's weight.
  • When a team is skated relentlessly by their coach during practice.
  • A player who has scored four goals in a single game.
  • When a player's curve is too big.
  • A player that's always hurt.
  • When a shot hits the crossbar and goes straight down into the net.
  • Similar to bar down, but the shot hits the top part of the goalpost and goes into the net.
  • When the puck hits the crossbar and goes up.
  • Specifically at an ODR - when the puck hits the crossbar and flies out of the rink.
  • When the puck hits the crossbar and goes down into the net.
  • The arena or rink where the game is played.
  • A very close
  • The net.
  • A slang term for the word bud or buddy, the most commonly used word in hockey.
  • Trash talk for someone with a big nose.
  • In reference to a goalie being deked or otherwise scored on in an embarrassing manner.
  • Another term of endearment for somebody that is either a great player on the ice and/or off the ice too.
  • A term of endearment used to describe a player who is particularly skilled or attractive.
  • A pretty play.
  • A specific move performed by a player using their stick. It involves flipping the blade of the stick upwards towards the back of an opponent's leg or skate, with the intent of disrupting their balance or impeding their movement.
  • Banging your stick on the ice. During game play this is a call for a pass from the puck handler. The message is "here I am pass it to me". The beaver tap is also used as a type of applause. For example when an injured player who is down on the ice finally gets up and heads to the bench, they(...) Read More
  • An amateur hockey league where players typically drink beer after games and sometimes even before games.
  • The head coach.
  • A minor penalty given to a team and usually meant for an infraction by the coach, such as having too many players on the ice at one time.
  • A player that sits most of the game on the bench.
  • A badly skating player whose ankles bend beneath him.
  • A shot or deflection that goes between a goaltenders leg pads (aka Pillows).
  • Where the goalie plays.
  • Refers to a player known for delivering powerful and often bone-crushing body checks or hits on opponents. These hits are characterized by their force and impact, and they can be a significant aspect of a player's style of play.
  • Scoring a goal.
  • A cage on a helmet.
  • Another term for the puck.
  • The puck hitting the back of the net on a goal.
  • An AHL player whose team was eliminated, and then called up by the NHL affiliate for a playoff game.
  • The flat part of a hockey stick used for passing and shooting.
  • A pass to a teammate who is blocked
  • The rectangular pad that a goaltender wears on the hand used to hold their goalie stick.
  • When a player loses their edge.
  • When a player looses his edge and falls to the ice.
  • Getting hit hard during game play.
  • The two lines located on either side of the red line The blue lines divide the rink into three zones
  • The blue-colored semi-circular area marked in front of the goaltender's crease in both the offensive and defensive zones. It is sometimes called the "crease" or the "goal crease."
  • A defenceman.
  • A penalty where a player checks an opposing player into the boards too aggressively.
  • The wall around a hockey rink measuring about 42 inches high and topped off by synthetic glass to protect the spectators while giving them a good view of the action.
  • Getting hit hard.
  • To hit an opponent with your body, to block him or take him out of the play.
  • Any type of physical contact made between players during a game.
  • The way a player positions their body in order to gain an advantage or defend against an opposing player.
  • Helmet.
  • See "Grocery Stick". Read More
  • A pair of skates.
  • When a goal breaks/pops the goalie's water bottle.
  • When a goal breaks the goalie's water bottle that sits on top of the net.
  • A situation in which the puck is not lying flat on the ice but is instead moving in an uneven, unpredictable manner. Bouncing pucks are challenging to control and can create difficulties for both players and goaltenders due to their unpredictable trajectory.
  • When you get hit with an elbow.
  • A defensive alignment (similar to the diamond) often used by a team defending against a power play. 2nd Definition- Place where one goes to serve a penalty.
  • Refers to a goalie's chest.
  • When a player gets past all of the opposing players and has a clear path to the net.
  • A long pass that sends a player in on a breakaway.
  • The transition from defense to offense as the team moves the puck out of their defensive zone.
  • A pass made to move the puck out of the defensive zone.
  • Hockey pants.
  • A player's helmet.
  • A derogatory term for a player who is not skilled or effective.
  • See "Bucket". Read More
  • A faceoff where two players fight for the puck by using their sticks to push and pull it.
  • A type of pass made by a player that involves redirecting the puck off the boards or the side of the rink, allowing it to travel along the boards to a teammate. This technique is often used to advance the puck quickly and accurately to a teammate, especially when a direct pass through the(...) Read More
  • To shoot the puck (bisquit) into the net. Scoring a with authority.
  • A player that doesn't live up to their potential.
  • The act of thrusting the knob or butt end of a stick into an opponent Considered a dirty play which often results in a major penalty.
  • To describe something smooth, such as a play or a player's hands.
  • A goaltending technique where the goalie drops to the ice and spreads their legs to cover the bottom of the net resembling a butteryfly
  • A goal that is scored just before the end of a period or game.
  • The net.
  • A face mask worn by players to protect their face.
  • A player who is brought up from a lower league to a higher league.
  • When a player puts their stick between another player's legs and twists.
  • Refers to a specific way of taping the blade of a stick. When a player tapes their stick blade in a "candy cane" pattern, they apply the tape in a diagonal spiral from the heel of the blade to the toe. This creates a pattern that looks like the stripes on a candy cane.
  • For the goalie, this is a glove (which looks like a fancy first-baseman's mitt) that goes on the non-stick hand.
  • The webbed glove that the goaltender wears on the hand opposite the stick (Also known as the trapper).
  • A bushy moustache.
  • A celebration after scoring a goal.
  • The act of sprinkling or tossing salt on the ice as part of a celebration after scoring a goal The term "celly salt" is often used in reference to players who use this type of celebration. Read More
  • A player's post-goal celebration.
  • A goal scored with a celly celebration afterwards.
  • The player who takes faceoffs and plays primarily in the middle of the ice.
  • The neutral area between the two blue lines.
  • The red stripe that extends across the ice, midway between the two goals.
  • A forward position whose primary zone of play is the middle of the ice The Center is responsible for taking faceoffs.
  • When players on the ice switch with fresh players on the bench while the game is going on.
  • Taking more than three skating strides prior to checking an opponent. Signaled by rotating clenched fists around one another in front of chest.
  • Attempting to injure a palyer using unethical or illegal methods.
  • A check occurs when a player bumps or pushes into another player for example
  • Making contatc to an opponents head using their body or stick.
  • When a player uses their body or stick to stop or slow down an opposing player.
  • Checking or hitting an opponent whose back is facing you
  • A term used to describe a creative or unconventional shot attempt, often characterized by its unpredictability, finesse, and the element of surprise. Cheeky shots are usually taken in situations where a more traditional shot may not be expected or where the player wants to catch the(...) Read More
  • A goal that is scored high, often just under the crossbar.
  • Refers to the top shelf of the net, where a skilled shooter aims to score.
  • The EA Sports NHL video game.
  • A player who doesn't help defensively and stays near center ice to get a puck chipped up to him for an easy breakaway.
  • Teeth.
  • When you lightly hit the puck off the boards.
  • Used to characterize aggressive or rough play by a player or team.
  • Used to describe a style of play characterized by a high level of physicality, aggression, and sometimes, an elevated degree of confrontational behavior between players. A game or situation is considered "chippy" when there are frequent scrums, altercations, and aggressive plays on the ice.
  • To trash talk or taunt an opposing player.
  • When a player purposely steals a point from a teammate by going up to the referee and claiming that they got an assist on a goal when they in fact didn't earn one. A player who steals points this way is called a 'chiseler'.
  • Dropping the gloves.
  • A hard slap shot.
  • A body check or body contact made by a player on an opponent that is executed within the rules of the game and does not result in a penalty or any other disciplinary action. A clean hit is a legal and fair physical play intended to separate an opponent from the puck or disrupt their progress(...) Read More
  • Getting the puck away from the area near your own goal; on a power play, sending the puck out of your own defensive zone.
  • Hitting an opponent below thje knees. This is a penalty.
  • a defensive strategy employed by a defenseman or a defending player to reduce the distance or space between themselves and an opponent who is carrying the puck or moving into an offensive position. The goal of closing the gap is to limit the opponent's time and space, making it more(...) Read More
  • The person who directs the team during the game and leads the team in practice and preparation.
  • When a player takes the puck from one end of the rink to the other and scores.
  • penalties that occur at the same time when both teams are assessed an equal amount of penalties These types of penalties usually happen on the same play or incident.
  • When both reams are assessed an equal number of penalties at the same time.
  • Prime scoring area of the faceoff circle towards center ice and in front of the goal.
  • A term used in ice hockey to describe an offensive strategy in which a player drives straight to the net
  • The blue painted area in front of the net where only the goalie is allowed to play the puck.
  • Taking a hard shot right in front of the goaltender.
  • When a player enters the crease area and interferes with the goalie.
  • A tactical play executed by two players, often forwards, as they skate through the offensive zone. The play involves the players crossing paths with each other while in motion to confuse defenders and create scoring opportunities. The success of a criss-cross play relies on the timing and(...) Read More
  • Hitting an opponent with both hands on the stick and no part of the stick on the ice.Signaled by a forward motion with both fists clenched extending from the chest.
  • the post that runs along the top of the net.
  • A skating technique used by players to increase their speed, agility, and ability to make tight turns while maintaining control of the puck. Crossovers involve a specific pattern of footwork where one skate crosses over the other while skating forward. Crossovers are executed by taking(...) Read More
  • Hockey stick or a tap on the shoulder from a coach to a certain player to hop on the ice and do their thing.
  • A goaltending technique used by goaltenders to reduce the available shooting angle for an opposing player who is about to take a shot on goal. The primary goal of this technique is to make it more challenging for the shooter to find open space in the net and increase the chances of making a(...) Read More
  • An offensive strategy that moves the puck along the boards in the offensive zone to create a scoring chance by making defenders tired or moving them out of position.
  • Playing in a championship game or series.
  • A hockey fight between two well known tough guys.
  • A play that puts a player in harms way risking injury. Swinging the stick
  • A move or deke where a player skillfully maneuvers around an opposing player.
  • A player who is extremely skilled with stick-handling.
  • Another term for the boards specifically the bottom part of the boards from the glass to the ice surface.
  • One of the greatest deke's of all time. This move sends the goalie to the opposite side of the net, giving the player a completely empty net to score on.
  • The players who primarily defend their own zone and try to prevent the opposing team from scoring.
  • When the other team is on the attack, the defensive zone is the area between your goal line and your blue line.
  • Refers to the act of redirecting the path of a puck that is already in motion. It involves using a stick or any part of the body to change the direction or trajectory of the puck, typically in an attempt to score a goal or create a scoring opportunity for a teammate.
  • A move made by a player to fake out an opposing player with the puck by quickly changing direction or puck movement.
  • A penalty where a player or team intentionally delays the game, such as by covering the puck with their hand or shooting the puck over the boards and glass.
  • When an attacking player has preceded the puck into the offensive zone, but the defending team has gained possession of the puck and can bring it out of their defensive zone without any delay or contact with an opposing player.
  • When a referee signals that he is about to penalize a player, but will not stop play until the team to be penalized touches the puck. Signaled by the non-whistle hand is extended straight above the head.
  • Used to describe a team's penalty killing strategy in which the players defend in a diamond shaped formation.
  • A team or player's ability to control and influence the flow and tempo of the game by setting the pace, making strategic decisions, and executing plays that force the opposing team to react defensively. It involves taking charge of the game's dynamics and making the opponent respond to your(...) Read More
  • An attempt to gain possession of the puck in the corners of the rink.
  • When a coach tells their players to kick up a notch.
  • The action of battling for the puck along the boards or in the corners of the rink. It typically involves players using their sticks
  • Dangling with the puck while skating at a quick pace.
  • Synonym for stickhandling.
  • Changing the course of the puck in a desired direction by using the body
  • An unfair, malicious play.
  • Used to describe an incredible deke or pass.
  • Fancy stickhandling moves.
  • Next-level. So good it's definitely bad.
  • Making a pass.
  • When a player exaggerates being hooked or tripped in an attempt to draw a penalty.
  • The act of a player embellishing contact made against him in order to entice the referee into calling a penalty against the opposition Blatant diving now often ends up in a ΓÇ£unsportsmanlike conductΓÇ¥ penalty being called against the embellishing player.
  • A player's head, usually a large one.
  • A large fight or brawl involving multiple players.
  • The solid red dot at the center of the face off circles where the referee drops the puck.
  • An aggressive offensive rush or attack. It signifies a player or the puck surging through the ice, aiming to create scoring chances or apply pressure on the opposing team's defense and goaltender.
  • Generally describes a face-off.
  • A player who often lacks talent, but is well liked in the room.
  • A pass made by a player to a teammate who is behind them.
  • When a player challenges you to a fight, you both need to drop the mitts to signal your acceptance.
  • A move where a player kicks the puck with their skate to make a pass or shot.
  • When someone gets absolutely demolished by a hit or in a fight.
  • Refers to getting the puck deep in the offensive zone and getting off the ice.
  • A strategy where a player dumps the puck into the offensive zone and chases after it to regain possession.
  • A minor scuffle between players.
  • Someone who doesn't get much playing time and collects dust on the bench.
  • When a player leaves the ice and goes to the locker room because he was given a penalty that would last longer than the time remaining in the period or game.
  • Being on the ice when the opposing team scores a goal.
  • When the game ends 0-0.
  • Using an elbow in any way to foul an opponent. Signaled by tapping the elbow of the whistle hand with the opposite hand.
  • A situation where a team's goaltender has been removed from the net, leaving the opposing team's net unguarded or "empty." This strategic decision is typically made in the late stages of a game when a team is trailing and needs to score additional goals to try to tie the game or mount a comeback.
  • A goal scored against an opponent that has pulled the goalie.
  • The boards at either end of the rink behind the two nets.
  • A trio of forwards who can get the crowd excited with big plays or big checks.
  • The player that steps in to fight and defend teammates from opponents that make illegal contact.
  • Act of discarding sticks
  • When both teams have the same number of players on the ice.
  • When both teams have the same number of players on the ice.
  • A team's successful effort to move the puck out of their defensive zone and into the neutral or offensive zone while maintaining control and minimizing turnovers or defensive mistakes. It is an important aspect of the game and a key component of effective defensive play and transition to offense.
  • The NHL expansion era began in 1967 when the league expanded beyond the Original Six teams.
  • When a team is down in a game but there is still a chance they can win, they can put their goalie on the bench and substitute in another player This person becomes an extra attacker.
  • Can be either Wing or Center. F1 means first forward to enter the offensive zone.
  • Can be either Wing or Center. F2 means 2nd forward to enter the offensive zone.
  • Can be either Wing or Center. F3 means 3rd and last forward to enter the offensive zone.
  • The helmet that goalies wear to protect their head and face.
  • When the referee drops the puck between two opposing players to start or resume the game after a stoppage in play.
  • When the referee drops the puck between two opposing players to start or restart the game.
  • The circles on the ice where faceoffs take place.
  • A clear shield worn by some players to protect their face and eyes.
  • When a player rubs their glove or hand in an opposing player's face during a scrum.
  • When a player encroaches on the faceoff circle before the puck is dropped.
  • a specific type of slap shot that is executed by a player while moving away from the net or the target they are shooting at. It combines elements of a slap shot with a quick release and is often used as a deceptive shooting technique. By moving away from the net, the player can create the(...) Read More
  • When a player misses (fans) the puck while attempting a shot or a pass.
  • Refers to the area of the net that is farther away from the shooter. It is the opposite of the "short side," which is the area of the net that is closer to the shooter's side or the side of the net they are shooting from. Read More
  • A pass.
  • A situation that can occur during a game when two players engage in a physical confrontation or fight. Fencing involves players using their hockey sticks to jab or poke at each other in a manner resembling a sword fight, hence the term "fencing."
  • A term for phrase meaning "for the boys". Read More
  • The act of engaging in fisticuffs with an opponent A five-minute major penalty given to any players engaged in fighting.
  • Skating around circles, typically done in practice.
  • A move or play that is incredibly impressive or skillful.
  • A colloquial expression used to describe a player or a team that is gradually getting into a rhythm, gaining momentum, and improving their skating performance as a game progresses. It suggests that, at the start of a game or after a break, players might initially feel sluggish or not fully(...) Read More
  • Getting excited.
  • A helmet with a full visor face sheild.
  • A term used to describe a player's actions when they repeatedly use their stick to reach or poke at the puck in an attempt to gain possession of it. This action is typically seen in situations where the puck is in a congested or scrappy area, such as in the corners, along the boards, or in(...) Read More
  • The area between a goalie's legs where a shot can be scored.
  • When a team is short one palyer due to a penalty. Also referred to as a one-man advantage.
  • When one team has two players in the penalty box and the other team has all five. Also referred to as a two-man advantage.
  • When a player lifts one leg
  • A slang term used to describe a defensive player who lifts one of their legs, resembling the pose of a flamingo bird, in an attempt to block a shot. This maneuver is typically employed when a player is trying to protect themselves from getting hit by a hard slap shot or one-timer while(...) Read More
  • When a goalie makes a quick dramatic glove save.
  • A pass where the puck remains on the surface of the ice.
  • The amount of bend in a hockey stick when a player takes a shot.
  • A pass to a teammate where the puck is lifted slightly off the ice.
  • A type of shot or pass in which a player elevates the puck off the ice, causing it to fly through the air in a high arc. Flip shots are used for various purposes, including getting the puck over defenders, sending it deep into the offensive zone, or attempting to score goals in certain situations.
  • Used to describe a Zamboni cleaning the ice.
  • A goalie prone to going down on the ice to stop pucks. The opposite of a 'stand up' goalie.
  • A player's long, flowing hairstyle that can be seen sticking out of their helmet.
  • A player with long hair who tucks it into their helmet.
  • A player with particularly impressive and well-maintained hair.
  • A situation where a player skates close to or past an opponent without making physical contact or engaging in a check. Instead of attempting to body-check or make physical contact with the opponent, the player may simply skate by them in an attempt to disrupt their play or force them to make(...) Read More
  • the act of hitting an opponent with ones forearem If detected by the officials this may result in a minor or major penalty.
  • Attacking in the offensive zone.
  • When a offensive player checks an opponent in his own end in order to take the puck away to continue the attack and prevent them from moving up ice towards their goal.
  • The three attacking offensive players (centre, left wing and right wing) who play more in the other team's end and are usually responsible for scoring goals and producing offensive output.
  • A skirmish or gathering of players.
  • A player freezes the puck by holding it against the boards with the stick or skates. A goalie freezes the puck by either holding the puck in the glove or trapping it on the ice.
  • When a player
  • The physical confrontation and intense competition that occurs in front of the opposing team's net. It involves players from both teams jostling
  • When a teammate selflessly sacrifices themselves, often for the benefit of the rest of the team.
  • When both teams have all five skaters and a goaile on the ice.
  • When a team has all six of its players on the ice at one time.
  • A penalty resulting in the player being suspended for the remainder of the game.
  • A player receives credit for playing in a game if
  • The final goal scored in a tie game.
  • After the final score has been determined, the goal which leaves the winning Club one goal ahead of its opponent is the game-winning goal (example
  • Referring to the puck when there is a rebound. Picking up the garbage means putting the rebound in the net.
  • A goal scored from close range or due to a lucky bounce.
  • A player who is extremely tired or fatigued. When a player becomes "gassed Read More
  • Short form for Gatorade.
  • A popular drill every player participated when learning how to bodycheck.
  • A slang term for goal.
  • A passing play where a player passes the puck to a teammate and immediately receives it back.
  • A give and go involves two players passing the puck to each other in rapid succession. The play typically begins with one player (Player A) passing the puck to their teammate (Player B) and then immediately moving into a position to receive a return pass. After making the initial pass, Player(...) Read More
  • the outside perimeter above the boards used to protect fans watching the game.
  • A player who is physically fragile on the ice.
  • A player who bangs his stick against the glass to encourage his team or intimidate opponents.
  • The hand a goalie uses to catch and block shots with their glove.
  • A save made by the goalie using their glove.
  • A goal is achieved when the entire puck crosses the goal line and enters the net.
  • The total number of goals the goaltender allows during a certain period of time (usually a season or a playoffs) is divided by the number of games played. The resulting number is the goaltender's GAA.
  • Another name for the net or goal.
  • The red line which runs between the goal posts and extends in both directions to the side boards.
  • A hockey goal has a bar that's horizontal to the ice and then curves down on either side to form two vertical posts known as the goal posts.
  • The player who defends the net and tries to prevent the opposing team from scoring.
  • The protective mask worn by the goalie to protect their face.
  • The player who guards the goal, also called the goalie or netminder.
  • Multiply goals allowed (GA) by 60 and divide by minutes played (MINS).
  • Another term for a goalie.
  • A goaltender receives a win, tie or loss if he is on the ice when either the game-winning or game-tying goal is scored.
  • A goaltender shall not be sent to the penalty box for an infraction
  • Refers to a game-winning, overtime goal. Used during the Olympics as the gold medal game-winning goal.
  • A player who takes a lot of big hits.
  • When a game gets chaotic and out of controlusually because of a very lopsided score, resulting in fights and big hits breaking out.
  • A penalty taken as a a strategic choice to prevent a more dangerous scoring opportunity. For example, hooking or tripping a player who is on a breakaway therby disrupting the scoring opportunity.
  • A player who is often unskilled and is only on the ice with the intent of hitting, fighting and hurting opponents.
  • A shutout victory by a team or a goaltender. It means that the opposing team has failed to score any goals during the game, resulting in a final score of 0 for them.
  • When a player scores a goal, has an assist and gets in a fight in one game. Named after former player Gordie Howe who was known for both his toughness and scoring abilities.
  • A player who is never happy with their pre-game meal.
  • An abbreviation for "games played." Read More
  • A word insinuating that goalie couldn't stop an easy shot.
  • A goal or play that is messy, lucky or gritty.
  • A goal that is scored off a rebound or deflection.
  • The area behind the net made famous by Wayne Gretzky when he used to set up a number of his amazing plays.
  • To work hard in the corners and along the boards to win battles for the puck.
  • A team's checking line
  • A type of player known for his checking ability and work ethic; often associated with a player who is strong defensively, but who doesn't score many points.
  • Players who are known for their hard work and tenacity, often playing on the third or fourth line.
  • The player who separates the offense from the defense on the bench.
  • So good that it's almost bad.
  • A game misconduct penalty for extreme unsportsmanlike conduct when a player or coach make a mockery of the game.
  • A hard chop or slash with a stick.
  • The area along the side boards or side walls of the rink, roughly halfway between the blue line and the goal line. The side boards are the walls that run parallel to the length of the ice surface. The half boards are an important area on the ice where a lot of action takes place during a game.
  • The area half way between the blue line and the corner alog the boards.
  • A hard shot, usually taken from the point or blue line.
  • When a player is on the recipient end of a huge bodycheck.
  • Passing the puck using one's hand. This is legal inside a team's defensive zone
  • Refers to a player who has good stickhandling and often dangles opposing players.
  • To win a championship or significant tournament.
  • A term used to describe a type of pass or play where a player quickly and forcefully shoots the puck along the boards or "around the boards" in an attempt to clear it out of the defensive zone or transition it to the neutral zone or offensive zone. The objective of a hard around pass or play(...) Read More
  • Someone who tries really hard to look tough.
  • Trophies
  • Shoving the stick into the goalie's pads in order to push the puck over the goal line. It is an illegal play.
  • The straight lines that stick out from all face-off circles, where left and right-wingers line up before a face-off.
  • When a player scores three goals in one game.
  • Short for a hat trick, which is when a player scores three goals in a game.
  • A wild, hard punch thrown in a fight.
  • To deliberately hitt an opponent or direct the puck into the net using one's head. Headbutting is a penalty. Headbutting the puck into the net results in no goal.
  • The act of contacting a player above the shoulders with any part of the body or stick.
  • Passing to a teammate moving up the ice ahead of the player making the pass.
  • When a team has strung together a series of wins.
  • Refers to a hard-hitting player.
  • The point where the shaft of the stick and the bottom of the blade meet.
  • Striking your opponent while carrying the stick above shoulder level. Signaled by holding both fists
  • A specific offensive strategy or play that involves moving the puck from a higher position in the offensive zone, typically near the blue line, down to a lower position closer to the goal line or behind the net. This strategy is often used to maintain possession of the puck, create scoring(...) Read More
  • A stickhandling manouver of lifting the puck onto the stick blade while skating behind the net and then attempting to throw the puck under the top corner of the goal. Also referred to as a Michigan or lacrosse move.
  • aAdefensive maneuver used by a player to legally impede the progress of an opponent by making contact with their hip. It involves using the hip to forcefully bump or collide with the opponent's hip or lower body
  • Swedish word for mullet.
  • Lifting the puck off the ice by flipping it with the blade of the stick.
  • Holding an opponent from moving with hands or stick or any other way. Signaled by clasping the wrist of the whistle hand well in front of the chest.
  • A player who shows up to the rink already dressed in their uniform.
  • The advantage a team has when playing on their home rink in front of their home crowd.
  • a specific area or shape on the ice, usually in the offensive zone, that resembles the shape of home plate in baseball. It is an imaginary area or zone that extends outward from the front of the opponent's net, and it is often used to describe an advantageous position for a player to be in(...) Read More
  • Hooking a stick around an opponent to try to block his progress. Signaled by a tugging motion with both arms, as if pulling something toward the stomach.
  • A hockey drill commonly used in warm-ups.
  • A slang or derogatory term that is often used informally to describe someone who is not very skilled or competent at playing hockey. It is typically used in a playful or teasing manner to poke fun at a player's abilities. Derived from a time when the losing team or worse player had to hose(...) Read More
  • A player who shows off and takes unnecessary risks on the ice.
  • The act of showboating after making a strong play or scoring a goal.
  • A hard slap shot or hard shot in general.
  • A goaltender's positioning and technique when they place themselves very close to one of the goalposts, usually the near post, to minimize the space between their body and the post. This defensive posture is employed to prevent the opposing team from scoring by taking away potential openings(...) Read More
  • The frozen water or artificial ice on which a game of ice hockey is played.
  • When a player shoots the puck from behind their own side of the center line all the way down to the other end of the ice without it being touched by anyone else
  • To be in the goal crease. Normally reserved for the goalie.
  • The area of the ice surface that is bounded by the faceoff dots in the offensive zone. The faceoff dots are small circles or dots located on the rink, and they are typically used as reference points for conducting faceoffs. The dots are situated in various locations on the ice, including in(...) Read More
  • A goal scored by a team that already has the lead
  • Illegal body contact with an opponent who is not in possession of the puck, or knocking an opponent's fallen stick out of his reach. Signaled by crossed arms stationary in front of chest with fists closed.
  • The goalpost or crossbar of the net.
  • A defensive power play strategy while defending against a five on threee advantage. Two defenseman and the goalie align themselves in diamond shape so that imaginary lines drawn through the two defencemen and through the forward and goaltender form the shape of a cross.
  • A player that plays many consecutive games and rarely misses a game.
  •  A player's attempt to push or force the puck into the opposing team's net by applying pressure near the goal crease. This action often occurs in front of the net when there is a scramble for the puck, and multiple players from both teams are trying to gain possession and score a goal.
  • A player who gets traded frequently.
  • A tooth.
  • A protective cup worn by male players.
  • A hard and fast slapshot.
  • Energy or momentum in a game.
  • The area where the post and crossbar meet.
  • Referring to a player who is still in junior hockey or has just entered the professional ranks.
  • Refers to the developmental leagues for young players who are not yet ready for the professional level.
  • A goal that is scored from close range or off a deflection.
  • A play made by a offensive player (usually a defenseman) at the blue line to prevent the puck from exiting the offensive zone and keep it in play. It involves using various techniques to stop or control the puck, preventing it from crossing the blue line and maintaining offensive pressure.
  • A coach's instruction to keep skating and stay active on the ice.
  • A warning to a player to be aware of their surroundings to avoid being hit.
  • An illegal shot where the player kicks the blade of his stick as it carries the puck.
  • Using your skayes to propell the puck.
  • The act of kicking the opposing player. This is a match penalty.
  • Penalty kill or the act of killing off a penalty.
  • When a team survives a penalty without giving up a goal.
  • When 2 players collide and hit each other's knee. A very dangerous play that usually leads to a fight because of the intent to injure, especially if it appears to be intentional.
  • The act of hitting an opposing player while leading with an outstreached knee. This is considered a dirty and dangerous play as it can lead to serious injury and many times leads to a fight.
  • The butt-end of a hockey stick, where the tape is usually a little thicker.
  • A shot where the puck spins rapidly in the air, named after the movie "The Mighty Ducks". Read More
  • When a player gets absolutely demolished by a defender while trying to enter the offensive zone. Coined after Niklas Kronwall due to his massive hits.
  • Getting dressed for a game.
  • A player who takes a lap around the rink after a game or practice.
  • Unbelievably accurate and hard shot.
  • The player on the forward line who mainly plays on the left side of the ice.
  • The left wing lock is a defensive strategy in ice hockey where the team's forwards and defensemen position themselves to clog the neutral zone, making it difficult for the opposing team to carry the puck into the offensive zone.
  • Goalie pads.
  • The bottom part of long underwear.
  • Hair, including both on the head and facial hair.
  • Refers to a small rubber or plastic knob at the end of a hockey stick. This knob is typically colored black and is designed to prevent the player's hand from slipping off the end of the stick during play.
  • Helmet.
  • The lie of a hockey stick is indicated by a number on the shaft
  • When a player scores a goal. Refers to the goal light lighting up.
  • The three forwards on the ice (center and two wings).
  • When a fight or mutliple fights break out involving all the players on the ice at the time.
  • An on-ice official responsible for most face-offs
  • A player's mustache.
  • A hockey palyer's thick and bushy mustache.
  • A stickhandling manouver of lifting the puck onto the stick blade while skating behind the net and then attempting to throw the puck under the top corner of the goal. Also referred to as a high wrap or Michigan move.
  • A player's hair.
  • When the goaltenders change ends in the second period putting the players' benches farther from their defensive zone therby making it harder to get to the bench for a change.
  • A rule variation that comes into play during the second period of a game when teams must defend the goal that is furthest away from their bench. This rule change is specific to the NHL and some other high-level leagues and is not typically used in lower-level or recreational hockey. The long(...) Read More
  • A colloquial expression used to describe loose or rebounding pucks that are left in front of the opposing team's net, usually after a scoring attempt or a save by the goaltender. Loose change pucks are often seen as prime scoring opportunities because they are in close proximity to the net,(...) Read More
  • Refers to a puck that is not under the control of any player on the ice. A loose puck is in a state of free movement, typically found on the ice surface and available for any player from either team to attempt to gain control of it.
  • When a coach thinks their players are taking it too easy.
  • Refers to a player's momentary loss of control or possession of the puck. When a player "loses the handle," it means they temporarily mishandle or fumble the puck, often resulting in a missed scoring opportunity, turnover, or a change in the flow of the play.
  • A specific play or strategy where the puck is moved from the lower area of the offensive zone
  • A player's hockey stick. Goes back to when sticks were made of wood.
  • A five-minute penalty given for serious infractions of the rules; these penalties last the full five minutes even if the opposing team scores during the power play Examples of major penalties include fighting and high sticking where the opposing player is cut.
  • A penalty called by a referee to make up for a previous missed or incorrect call.
  • When one team has a penalty and the other has more players on the ice; also referred to as a power play, the opposite of playing shorthanded.
  • A well-known conditioning drill in hockey.
  • A warning given to a teammate that an opposing player is coming up from behind to check him.
  • A match penalty involves the suspension of a player for the balance of the game and the offender shall be ordered to the dressing room immediately.
  • Penalties given to players from each team at the same time.
  • Somebody who is pretty much only good at hitting or fighting.
  • A stickhandling manouver of lifting the puck onto the stick blade while skating behind the net and then attempting to throw the puck under the top corner of the goal. Also referred to as a high wrap or lacrosse move.
  • A minor penalty
  • A ten-minute penalty against a player. The team does not play a man down or shorthanded.
  • A situation where game officials, such as referees and linesmen, fail to notice or properly enforce a rule violation or an incident that should have resulted in a stoppage of play but did not. These missed stoppages can occur for various reasons, including human error, obstructed views, or(...) Read More
  • A situation in which a player or team fails to capitalize on a scoring chance or advantageous situation that could have resulted in a goal or a positive outcome. Missed opportunities can occur for various reasons, such as a player failing to score on an open net, a team not converting on a(...) Read More
  • A term for young beginner players.
  • Refers to a player's hands or gloves.
  • A significant change in the flow and momentum of a game. It occurs when one team gains an advantage or experiences a surge in performance that can alter the course of the game, either in their favor or against them. Momentum shifts are pivotal moments that can impact a team's confidence,(...) Read More
  • A mouthguard.
  • A player who is known for getting into physical battles for the puck in the corners and along the boards.
  • When a player has slow feet.
  • A weak or bad shot.
  • Punches thrown in a fight.
  • Act of a surprise attack or sucker punching another player without his knowledge.
  • The term "Munson" is sometimes used to refer to a player who falls awkwardly and ends up sliding headfirst into the boards. This term is derived from the character "Roy Munson" in the movie "Kingpin," who suffers a similar injury in a bowling accident. Read More
  • Someone who hits the post a ton and makes a ton of pipe music.
  • When you're panicking from the bench because your team can't clear the zone.
  • Putting a lot into hard shot.
  • Another word for a moustache.
  • A tough player that won't back down from a physical battle or a fight.
  • A tough player.
  • Scoring three goals in a row by the same player in one game without any other players scoring a goal in between.
  • The area a puck must enter to count as a goal The net opening is 4 feet high and 6 feet wide, with netting on the back part to trap the puck.
  • A specific type of scoring play where a player redirects a shot or a pass by making contact with the puck in front of the opposing team's net. These deflections are an effective way to score goals, as they change the direction of the puck and often catch goaltenders off guard. Net front(...) Read More
  • An offensive strategy of putting players in front of the goalie in order to screen their view of the puck and try to tip in shots or score goals from rebounds.
  • Another term for the goalie.
  • The center-ice area between the defending and attacking zones, enclosed by the two blue lines.
  • A defensive strategy where a team clogs the neutral zone to prevent the opposing team from entering the offensive zone.
  • A goal scored where the shooter only had a tiny space to put the puck.
  • When the number of offensive players heading into the attacking zone is greater than the number of defenders such as 2 against 1 or 3 against 2.
  • Outdoor rink.
  • A team's offensive zone is the area surrounding the goal in which they are trying to score.
  • 85 feet by 200 feet for NHL rinks and 98 feet by 200 feet for international/Olympic rinks.
  • The team of on-ice officials includes the referee and two linesmen There are also several off-ice officials
  • An offside pass (also known as a "two-line" pass) occurs when a member of the attacking team passes the puck from behind his own defending blue line to a teammate across the center red line. If the puck precedes the player across the red line Read More
  • When a player on the attacking team crosses the blue line into the offensive zone before the puck does.
  • A slang expression used to describe a player who is in a scoring streak or a hot streak. When a player is "on a heater," it means they have been consistently scoring goals or producing points in a series of games. They are performing at a high level offensively and finding the back of the net(...) Read More
  • Refers to the orientation of the hockey puck as it moves across the ice. When a puck is "on edge," it means that it is tilted or positioned so that one of its flat sides is facing upward, and the thin edge of the puck is facing forward or backward. Pucks in this state tend to wobble and may(...) Read More
  • A shot attempt that is directed towards the goal. When a player shoots the puck "on net Read More
  • Line change that occurs while play is going on.
  • A change of players that takes place during a shift.
  • When an attacking player has the puck and there is only one defending player between them and the goalie.
  • When a player receives a pass and shoots the puck without stopping it first.
  • A shot taken directly from a pass without stopping the puck.
  • A shot taken without stopping the puck first.
  • A type of pass in which a player receives the puck and immediately passes it to a teammate without first stopping or controlling the puck. This pass is executed with one fluid motion, and the player receiving the pass releases the puck quickly without any delay.
  • A big hit on that happens away from the boards.
  • The "Original Six" era in the National Hockey League (NHL) began in the 1942-1943 season and lasted until the 1966-1967 season. During this period Read More
  • The top of the face-off circle, where Alex Ovechkin has been scored many unstoppable goals over his career.
  • When a player attempts a hard shot and whiffs or sends the puck off target into to the corner.
  • An extra period of play added to the game when the score is tied at the end of regulation time.
  • When a player intentionally shoots low at the goalie hoping the shot will bounce off the goalie's pads to a teammate who can then shoot it in the net.
  • Goalie stick.
  • When one player uses his stick to send the puck to another player on the same team Passing the puck to a player who scores a goal is often credited with an assist.
  • A pass from a player behind the opponent's goal to a teammate in front of the goal.
  • A player who is just riding along by not playing hard and just going through the motions and not getting involved in the play.
  • A defnsive power play strategy where four players form a box in front of the goaltender. All four players remain in their position and try to interfere with attacking players and their pass attempts. Hence the term passive.
  • When you shoot the puck and it hangs in the net for a second.
  • A penalty is the result of an infraction of the rules by a player or team official.
  • The area where players who receive penalties sit out for the duration of their penalty.
  • The attempted act by a team that is short handed (due to a penalty) to keep the opposition from scoring referred to as killing off the penalty.
  • Subtract total number of power-play goals allowed from total number of shorthanded situations to get total number of power-plays killed. Divide the total number of power-plays killed by the total number of shorthanded situations.
  • The group of players brought in by a shorthanded team in order to defend against a power play.
  • A colloquial expression used to describe a situation in a game where multiple penalties are called in rapid succession, resulting in a series of players from both teams being sent to the penalty box. It often creates a chaotic and disruptive atmosphere on the ice, as teams play with fewer(...) Read More
  • Awarded for a player being fouled from behind and denied a breakaway scoring opportunity. Also called for deliberately displacing the goal post during a breakaway
  • Firing a number of shots at the goalie in quick succession
  • When a goaltender faces a ton of shots and his pads get black marks on them.
  • One of the three timed parts that make up a game, In hockey a period usually 20 minutes in length.
  • A player who is known for agitating opponents, often in annoying or dirty ways.
  • Used to describe when a point is given to a player who has not actually earned it.
  • When a player sets a legal screen on an opposing player to free up a teammate.
  • Refers to a player who is considered to be an easy target or an easy mark. This is typically a player who is perceived as weak or lacking in skill or toughness, and who can be easily taken advantage of by opposing players.
  • A player whose feet point inward when they skate.
  • The goaltender's leg pads.
  • Penalties in Minutes
  • When a defenseman moves deep into the offensive zone in an attempt to keep the puck inside the zone.
  • The bench where players sit when they are not on the ice.
  • The pipe is the goalpost, and if you hit a puck "between the pipes" you score a goal! Read More
  • The posts of the net.
  • A pass up the middle. A high risk play that often gets intercepted.
  • Penalty Kill.
  • A fast skilled player that has the speed and ability to make plays and set up their teammates to score. Playmakers usually get more assists than they do goals.
  • When players stop shaving during the playoffs.
  • A player who is not very talented or valuable to the team .
  • Maybe not the best player on the team, but a hard working player who does the dirty work in the corners.
  • A player receives a "plus" if he is on the ice when his Club scores an even-strength or shorthand goal. He receives a "minus" if he is on the ice for an even-strength or shorthand goal scored by the opposing Club. The difference in these numbers is considered the player's plus-minus statistic. Read More
  • The point is the area just inside the opposition's blue line close to the boards on either side of the rink. A defenseman usually occupies this area when his team is in control of the puck in the opposition's defensive zone.
  • A move to dislodge the puck from the puck carrier by stabbing at it with the blade of the stick.
  • When a defensive player uses thr blsad or toe of their stick to poke the puck away from the opponent.
  • The player that steps in to fight and defend teammates from opponents that make illegal contact.
  • Where players play outdoors in the winter.
  • A type of outdoore hockey usually played on the surface of a naturally frozen body of water like a pond or lake.
  • When a player intentionally shoots low at the goalie hoping the shot will bounce off the goalie's pads to a teammate who can then shoot it in the net.
  • The last player or goalie to make contact with the puck is the one who has possession. This definition includes a puck that is deflected off a player or any part of his equipment.
  • When both team's palyers form a line at center ice and the opposing players go down the line and shake hands. It’s a tradition fo showing respect to one another after a hard fought game. In the NHL post-game handshakes are resever for the final game in a playoff series. However, in many other(...) Read More
  • The game you play when there are no goalies present. Scoring a goal in posts requires hitting the goal post with the puck.
  • A large
  • When a n offensive player uses their speed and strenght to drive to the net.
  • A situation where a team has more players on the ice due to an opposing player being assessed a penalty.
  • A goal scored by a team while it has a manpower advantage due to an opponent's penalty.
  • Total number of power-play goals divided by total number of power-play opportunities.
  • A specialized training method in ice hockey that focuses on improving a player's skating technique, speed, power, and agility. It is a form of off-ice or on-ice training that emphasizes the fundamental skating skills required to excel in hockey. Power skating is typically conducted by(...) Read More
  • Power Play.
  • Power Play.
  • An annual award in the National Hockey League (NHL) given to the team that finishes the regular season with the best overall record.
  • The button you press in EA's NHL series on Xbox to initiate a fight.
  • The hard black vulcanized rubber disc that players try to shoot past the goalie for a goal.
  • A way of referring to a game of hockey.
  • Female groupie who hangs around trying to meet exclusively with hockey players.
  • The moment when the referee drops the puck to begin a faceoff.
  • When a team gets lucky bounces or breaks during the game.
  • The process of regaining possession of the puck after it has been lost or contested by the opposing team. It is an essential aspect of gameplay, as maintaining possession allows a team to continue their offensive attack or transition to defense.
  • Puck shot all the way around the boards and behind the attacking zone net.
  • When a player flinches when the puck flies by.
  • Getting the puck deep into the offensive zone behind the goal line.
  • When the goalie is taken off the ice and replaced with an extra skater This usually happens in the final minutes of a game, if a team needs to get a goal to even the score.
  • Shooting the puck.
  • When fans leaving the game/arena early thinking the game's outcome is already decided.
  • When a player falls to the ice pulling his opponent down on top of him to prematurely end a fight.
  • Replacing the goalie with an extra skater. This occurs when a team trails, usually by one goal in the last minute of the game. It is a high-risk attempt to tie the game.
  • When someone says that the officials have put their whistle in their pocket, they mean that they are letting the players play without stopping the game to call penalties for minor infractions.
  • A player
  • The player who takes on a crucial playmaking role on the power play unit. The quarterback's role is to facilitate the offense and create scoring opportunities while the team is on the power play. the responsibilities of a power play quarterback include: Setting up the Play: The quarterback(...) Read More
  • A fast moving rush from out of the defensive zone.
  • When the official loses sight of the puck and whisles the play dead even though the puck is still playable.
  • When someone is checked so hard that their body appears to go limp and resembles a ragdoll.
  • When a player kills of penalty time against his time by circling back towards his own goal while in possession of the puck.
  • A strategic play where a player intentionally slows down the game's pace and maintains possession of the puck, often in the offensive zone, to kill time and protect a lead. This tactic is used to control the game's tempo, prevent the opposing team from gaining possession, and run down the(...) Read More
  • A creative and unconventional way of attempting to score a goal. This type of shot involves lifting the puck off the ice in a high, arcing trajectory, causing the puck to resemble a rainbow as it travels towards the net. The goal of a rainbow shot is typically to surprise the goaltender by(...) Read More
  • A shot that bounces off the goalie or post and creates an opportunity for another shot.
  • A goaltender's ability to manage and direct the rebounds that occur after they make a save. When a goaltender stops a shot, the puck often rebounds off their pads or equipment. Effective rebound control involves minimizing the chances of the puck landing in a dangerous scoring position for(...) Read More
  • The light behind each goal that a goal judge turns on to signify a goal was scored.
  • The line splitting the rink in half at the center.
  • The referee supervises the game
  • The semi-circular area at the red line in front of the scorer's bench. Players may not enter this crease when occupied by a referee during a stoppage of play.
  • Renting a random goaltender to fill in when the regular tendy can't show up.
  • A defensive maneuver used by a player to disrupt an opponent's attack while simultaneously protecting themselves from being hit. It is a technique where a player
  • Act in which a player remains on bench for prolonged period of time based on the coaches preference for other, often more skilled players to receive ice time.
  • The defensemen typically stay back and help defend the goal
  • The wings
  • The player on the forward line who mainly plays on the right side of the ice.
  • To pass the puck around the boards in the offensive or defensive zone.
  • A puck that is intentionally sent along the boards, often high off the glass, to clear it out of the defensive zone or to initiate a quick breakout is sometimes referred to as a "rimmed" puck.
  • A very talented player that isn't on your team but plays for your team on an on-call basis.
  • The playing surface of ice.
  • Someone who either loves being at the rink or works there.
  • A hard, powerful shot.
  • Refers to a piece of gum or other debris that is stuck to the ice. In both cases, the presence of road apples can make the ice surface more difficult to skate on.
  • When a goalie makes a great save on what should have been a goal.
  • A rookie.
  • Slang term for a blazing shot.
  • When the puck rolls on its side.
  • First year player.
  • A minor penalty called for unnecessary rough play.
  • Hockey puck.
  • Refers to a player's shorter hairstyle.
  • Flukey goal off of goalies head.
  • Refers to a saucer pass, which is a pass that is lifted off the ice and travels through the air to its intended recipient.
  • A player who is particularly skilled at making saucer passes.
  • A request for a teammate to make a sauce pass.
  • A player who is particularly skilled at making saucer passes.
  • A term used by players who want a pass delivered to the side of their body.
  • Pass that is elevated slightly off of the ice.
  • A shot blocked by the goaltender, which would have been a goal if not stopped.
  • Subtract goals allowed (GA) from shots against (SA) to determine saves. Then divide saves by shots against.
  • Player on the team that everyone hates.
  • To get a goal.
  • Where several players from both teams fight for possession of the puck.
  • A fight.
  • A tactic used by the offensive team to obstruct the view of the goaltender
  • A shot that the goalie can't see because his vision is blocked by his own teammates or opposing team players.
  • Goaltender's view is blocked by players between him and the shooter.
  • Secondary scorers are typically players who are not the team's top goal scorers or point leaders but still contribute to the team's offensive output. Teams that can rely on a well-rounded offensive attack, with contributions from various lines and positions, are often more successful in the(...) Read More
  • A type of shot that is highly accurate and well-placed, often with the puck threading its way through a crowd of players or defenders before finding its way into the net. This term is used to describe a shot that skillfully navigates through a maze of bodies, sticks, and skates, making it(...) Read More
  • Short for "celebration," refers to a player's celebration after scoring a goal. Read More
  • The sewer area is a prime scoring location in front of the net. It is a high-traffic area where rebounds and deflections often occur. This area can become a "dumping ground" for loose pucks and other debris during the course of a game. Read More
  • When a player covers an opponent one-on-one everywhere on the ice in order to limit the effectiveness of this opponent.
  • The long, straight part of the stick.
  • A shot that misses the net completely.
  • A face mask.
  • The period of time a particular forward or defensive line is on the ice.
  • Having a black eye.
  • Pick-up game of hockey.
  • When a player's stick gets caught in another player's skate blade.
  • Insult used for a bad player.
  • Scoring attempt directed towards the net using a backhand shot
  • A breakaway competition used in a tied game to determine which team wins the game.
  • The specific clear channels or paths on the ice that a player uses to shoot the puck towards the net. These lanes are important for creating scoring opportunities, and players must be aware of them to maximize their chances of getting a shot on goal.
  • Divide the number of goals scored by the number of shots taken.
  • Getting down on one foot while lunging and gliding down the ice.
  • A tiebreaker where each team selects a few players to take penalty shots.
  • A situation where a team has fewer players available to participate in a game than the standard roster size. In the National Hockey League (NHL), the standard roster size is 20 players, consisting of 12 forwards, 6 defensemen, and 2 goaltenders. When a team has a short bench, it means they(...) Read More
  • When a team is playing with fewer players than their opponent due to a penalty or penalties.
  • Refers to the area of the net that is closer to the shooter's side or the side of the net they are shooting from. It is the opposite of the "far side," which is the area of the net that is farther away from the shooter. Read More
  • A goal scored by a team while it is playing shorthanded due to a penalty.
  • Slang and ultimately superior term for a shorthanded goal.
  • Punch or stick to the face.
  • If a player shoots the puck with the intention of scoring and if that shot would have gone in the net had the goaltender not stopped it, the shot is recorded as a "shot on goal". Read More
  • Shoulder pads.
  • Two players working together to stop the opposing team's players.
  • When the goalie has not allowed the opposing team to score any goals in a game.
  • If two goaltenders combine for a shutout, neither receives credit for the shutout. Instead it is recorded as a Club shutout.
  • A goaltender who allows a lot of goals, usually referred to as being full of holes.
  • A player's smooth stickhandling and skating abilities.
  • Refers to the penalty box where players go to serve their time for a penalty.
  • a specific skill and maneuver that players use to transition the puck from their skate to their stick, allowing them to gain control of the puck and continue their play. This technique is typically used when a player needs to quickly retrieve or control the puck and does not have immediate(...) Read More
  • A type of treadmill that is wider and longer then the typical runner's treadmill made of specially designed surfaces that allow players to practice skating techniques on a surface that resembles ice.
  • A term used to describe a dangerous situation in which a player is moving on the ice while looking at the puck or down at the ice surface instead of keeping their head up and aware of their surroundings. Skating with one's head down can lead to serious safety concerns and make a player(...) Read More
  • A type of pass that combines elements of both a slap shot and a traditional pass. It involves a player using a slap shot motion to pass the puck to a teammate rather than shooting it at the net. The objective of a slap pass is to move the puck quickly and accurately to a teammate, often in(...) Read More
  • A hard shot in which player takes a big swing before hitting the puck with the blade of his stick.
  • A shot taken with a full wind-up, where the player brings their stick back behind their body before shooting.
  • Hitting an opposing player with the stick or swinging the stick at an opposing player. Signaled by one chop with the non-whistle hand across the straightened forearm of the other hand.
  • When a player sweeps another player's feet out with their own stick or leg from behind causing the player to fall backwards which often causes injury.
  • The area immediately in front of the net between the two face-off circles, extending from the bottom of the circles up to the top of them. It is from this zone that most goals are scored and where most furious activity takes place.
  • When the referee is slow blowing the wistle compared to when the wistle would normally be blown.
  • When a goalie or other players fall on the puck. Smothering is legal when done by the goalie or accidentally by another player.
  • When a player is in the midst of a scoring drought.
  • A quick, low shot taken with a flick of the wrist.
  • A hybrid shot, essentially of a mix between a slapshot and a wrist shot.
  • An aggressive or physical style of play.
  • An insult, usually for a bad hockey player.
  • A fast, accurate shot that beats the goalie clean.
  • A game where a player scores multiple snipe goals.
  • A player who is a pure goal scorer and who doesn't hit other players or the boards all that much.
  • Stopping hard in front of a goalie's crease and deliberately throwing snow in their face.
  • When a player intentionally stopping in front of the goalie and thus spraying snow from the ice in the goaltenders face.
  • When you take one for the team.
  • Used to compliment, in reference to a players hands.
  • A colloquial and somewhat subjective term used to describe a player who is perceived as lacking physical toughness, grit, or the ability to withstand physical play. A "soft player" is often seen as someone who shies away from physical contact, avoids battles along the boards or in front of the(...) Read More
  • A hockey palyer's thick and bushy mustache.
  • Stabbing an opponent with the point of the stick blade while the stick is being carried in one or both hands. Signaled by a single jabbing motion with both hands together
  • When a player makes a full 360 degree spin while skating with the puck on their stick to create space or a scoring chance.
  • Hockey move where a player carries the puck in between two defenceman thereby "Splitting the Defence". Read More
  • When a player in possession of the puck goes between two opposing defenders while attacking.
  • Someone who scores a hat trick one night, then goes weeks without scoring.
  • Player has gotten cut and is bleeding.
  • A slang term for the word 'dud'.
  • SSD means Strong Side Defenseman, the Defenseman that is closest to the puck.
  • When a goalie lays on his side and puts his pads on top of each other to make a save.
  • The metal or plastic post on the boards that hold the glass in place.
  • A goalie that plays extremely well under severe pressure from the opposing team keeping the team from losing. Especially if the team is not playing well.
  • A type of goaltender who plays with a more upright and traditional style, as opposed to falling to his/hers knees like a "butterfly" or "hybrid" style. Read More
  • Game in which a goalie proves to be almost impossible to beat or score a goal on.
  • A defenseman who is strong in his own zone but not particularly good in the offensive zone.
  • Refers to a player, typically a defenseman, moving forward or "stepping up" from their defensive position to become more involved in the offensive play. This action is often taken strategically to create scoring opportunities or to put pressure on the opposing team.
  • The flat part at the end of a hockey stick used to control the puck.
  • A defensive maneuver where a player uses their stick to check or poke the puck away from an opposing player.
  • To control the puck with both the front and the back of the blade while in a skating motion.
  • The skill of controlling the puck with the stick while skating.
  • The tape that players wrap around the blade and handle of their stick for better grip and control.
  • Often used to describe a low-quality or poorly executed play
  • When a player has a great scoring opportunity but cannot score due to lack of skill.
  • When a goalie makes a great save.
  • When a goalie puts their pads on.
  • A long-distance pass made by a player or a series of passes aimed at quickly transitioning the puck from the defensive zone to the offensive zone. It is a strategic play used to catch the opposing team off guard and create a fast break or scoring opportunity.
  • The technique used by a player to quickly and efficiently return their skate back to a balanced and ready position after taking a skating stride. It's an important aspect of skating mechanics and is essential for maintaining speed, balance, and agility on the ice. In the context of forward(...) Read More
  • The referee.
  • A defensive maneuver in which a player successfully takes the puck away from an opponent who is in possession of it. This action involves using a stick check, body positioning, or physical contact to separate the opposing player from the puck, leading to a turnover in favor of the defensive team.
  • An overtime situation in which the next goal wins the game.
  • A dangerous pass made by a player that puts their teammate in a vulnerable position, often leading to a high risk of injury. It occurs when a player passes the puck to a teammate who is skating through the middle of the ice while being heavily checked or approaching opponents.
  • A player that gets traded a lot.
  • When a goaltender allows a lot of goals, infers getting a sunburn from the goal light behind them.
  • A hockey jersey.
  • Using the entire length of the stick with a sweeping motion along the surface off the ice in order to dislodge the puck from an opponent.
  • Used to decribe a goalie or team defence that is easily penetrable.
  • When a player skates out of the offensive zone back into the nuetral after a delayed offside is signaled by the linseman.
  • The most commonly used phrase by a coach, typically used before they explain a drill.
  • When a team intentionally plays poorly to increase their team's chances of getting a better draft pick.
  • A bundle of clear tape that a player develops into a massive ball.
  • The way a player applies tape to their stick blade.
  • A pass that goes directly from one player's stick blade to another's.
  • A jersey.
  • A person responsible for the operation of a team
  • The goaltender.
  • The goaltender.
  • A long looping turn instead of a quick stop and direction change.
  • The semi-circular area in front of each goal is called the crease. The crease is painted blue. The goal crease is designed to protect the goalies from interference by attacking players.
  • Wayne Gretzky
  • A junior hockey league, usually Junior B or lower.
  • The league that features the best players in the world-the NHL.
  • The high-scoring area in front of the net.
  • Refers to the referees and linesman.
  • Refers to a quick passing play in which three consecutive, fast passes lead to a goal.
  • To score a goal.
  • A fight or altercation between players, short for "tilt". Read More
  • A fight.
  • A 30 second break in the action called by the coach Often used to rest key players or devise a plan to score a goal or prevent the opposition from setting up in hopes of scoring a goal.
  • The act of redirecting a shot by deflecting it with the blade or shaft of the stick.
  • Abbreviation for tape job.
  • A move where a player pulls the puck back with the toe of their stick to avoid an opposing player.
  • When the toe of the skate hits the ice at a sharp angel causing the skater to